More mixed messages about using supplements and cancer risk. First, the good news from Caring4Cancer.com:

Selenium May Have Protective Effect Against Bladder Cancer
By CancerConsultants.com

Data from a combined analysis of previous studies suggest that higher levels of selenium are associated with lower risk of bladder cancer. These findings were recently published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.[1]

Each year in the United States, close to 53,000 men and 18,000 women are diagnosed with bladder cancer. Many bladder cancers are thought to be caused by exposure to cancer-causing agents that pass through the urine and come into contact with the bladder lining. The most important risk factor for bladder cancer is smoking, which increases risk by at least fourfold.

Dietary supplements such as multivitamins are used by many people in the hope of reducing the risk of cancer and other diseases. Evidence that dietary supplements reduce cancer risk is limited, however, and some studies have even suggested that certain types of dietary supplements may increase cancer risk. In a recent study, the researchers found no link between vitamin C, vitamin D, or vitamin E and risk of bladder cancer.[2]

Read more by going to: Selenium May Help Prevent Bladder Cancer.

Now here is some bad news from a site called HealthTree.com:

A new study by researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston shatters the belief that multivitamins may slow down colon cancer or even prolong a patient’s life.

Colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, is cancer of the large intestine, and combined with rectal cancer — the lowest part of the large intestine — it is the third most diagnosed cancer in both men and women in the U.S.

Researchers followed more than 1,000 individuals who had recently undergone surgery for advanced stage-2 colon cancer, and found that half of the patients used multivitamins during and six months after completing chemotherapy.

Go to: Multivitamins Unlikely to Help Colon Cancer Patients
by Nicole Service to read more about this study.

The news may be mixed about supplements preventing or slowing cancer, but not about the value of eating lots of raw fruits and vegetables every day–so visit the farmers market nearest you this week!

Feel good and keep smiling! Pat & Pattie

Leave a Reply